Sport-specific drills to improve your speed, agility, deceleration, landing mechanics, and injury prevention.

Be sure to read each description before and/or after watching the demonstration.

Ankle Stability: Single Leg Bosu Balance

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, football, track, any sport that requires running, agility, landing, or playing on an uneven surface.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Ankle/Lower Leg

Simply stand in the center of a Bosu ball one foot at a time, allowing your lower-leg musculature and balance to adjust to keep you upright. If one leg is too difficult, start by standing on both feet.


Ankle Stability: Bosu Land and Balance

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, volleyball, tennis, football, track, any sport that requires running, agility, landing, or playing on an uneven surface.

Difficulty: Intermediate to Advanced

Muscle Group: Ankle/Legs

*Only attempt this variation once you’re able to balance on one foot in the center of the Bosu ball.

Stand next to a Bosu ball and balance on one foot. Push your hips back and jump onto the center of the Bosu ball, keeping your weight in your glutes and your knee above or behind your toe. Balance for a couple seconds, and hop off.


Box Jump

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, hockey, lacrosse, baseball, softball, racquetball, any sport/activity that requires explosive lower body movements such as jumping or cutting.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Stand in front of a box, squat down and jump up onto the box. Land on the box with the same squat form as you would landing on the ground, with your weight in your heels and knees over toes.


Broad Jump Landing Mechanics: Forward to Forward

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires landing or slowing down from a jump or run.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Power and Deceleration

Start by dropping down into a squat. Leap forward instantly using your arms as well as your legs. As you land, push your hips back so your glutes and hamstrings do a majority of the work and your quads aren’t able to over-power them. Don’t allow your knees to track in front of, in the middle of, or to the outside of your toes upon landing.


Broad Jump Landing Mechanics: Forward to Sideways

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires landing or slowing down from a jump or run.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Power and Deceleration

Start by dropping down into a squat and leap forward. As you’re in the air, turn your body 90 degrees and land moving laterally.

The key here is to use the trailing leg to decelerate your body first, while finishing the landing with your weight equally distributed between legs. As you land, push your weight back into your heels so your glutes are doing a majority of the work. Don’t allow your knees to track over your toes.


Broad Jump Landing Mechanics: Sideways to Forward

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires landing or slowing down from a jump or run.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Power and Deceleration

Start by dropping down into a squat. Leap laterally, initiating the movement with your trailing leg and getting a majority of the power from your leading leg. As you’re in the air, turn your body 90 degrees and land facing the direction you’re moving.

The key here is to use the trailing leg to accelerate your body first, and the leading leg to produce a majority of the power to propel your body while finishing the landing with your weight equally distributed between legs. As you land, push your weight back into your heels so your glutes are doing a majority of the work. Don’t allow your knees to track over your toes or cave inwards or outwards.


Depth Jump Landing and Depth Jump

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, football, volleyball, any sport/activity that requires jumping/landing and use of lower body power.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Step off of a box and land by pushing your weight back into your heels and keeping your knees above your toes, finishing the landing with your thighs parallel to the ground.

For the depth jump, just land as directed above and explode up as high as you can, again landing down into a squat position.


Depth Jump With Forward Broad Jump

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, football, volleyball, any sport/activity that requires jumping/landing and use of lower body power.

Difficulty: Advanced

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Step off of a box and land softly while pushing your hips back as you would for a squat. Once you reach the bottom of the squat (90 degrees), explode out of it and leap forward, again landing softly and into a deep squat. Be sure you keep squat mechanics in mind – knees above the toes, weight in the heels, etc.


Depth Jump Landing With Lateral Shuffle

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, football, volleyball, any sport/activity that requires jumping/landing and quick lateral movement.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Step off of a box and land in a wide-stance squat position. Once you land with your weight in your heels and knees above toes, shuffle laterally 3 steps as quickly as you can and stop in a balanced position. The same move can be done by stepping off the box, performing one jump squat (a depth jump), and shuffling laterally upon landing.


Forward Sprint – 180-Degree Turn

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, racquetball, football, any sport/activity that requires changing directions while running.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

When watching the first part of decelerating to make a 180-degree turn, the right foot (decelerating leg) should point in the direction you are turning as you make your turn so you are able to push your hips back. The next and most important step is picking up that decelerating leg (right foot), pulling it back so it’s out of the way of the planting leg (my left leg), and pointing the toe forward so once the planting leg drives forward it can travel in a straight path to sprint in the opposite direction.


Kettlebell Circumduction Rotator Cuff Stretch/Exercise

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, baseball, softball, swimming, racquetball, any sport or activity that requires overhead movements of the arm that can result in overuse injury or injury caused by poor shoulder stabilization. These activities also benefit from optimal internal and external shoulder range of motion.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Rotator Cuff/Shoulder

Use this rotator cuff stretch/exercise to increase the flexibility and range of motion of the shoulder.


Lateral Deceleration Shuffle (slow)

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, football, lacrosse, hockey, any sport/activity that requires lateral movement or change of direction.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Lateral Deceleration

While shuffling slowly from side to side, focus on having your trailing leg (decelerating leg) make contact clearly before your leading leg. As you land on your decelerating leg, push your hips back and keep your weight in your heel. Keep your knees above your toes as you land. Your leading leg (the outside leg) should make contact with the ground as you change directions outstretched compared to your decelerating leg.

The more you use your decelerating leg to slow down and the less time your leading leg spends contacting the ground and pushing back, the quicker you will be able to change direction.

Make note of my center of gravity while my decelerating leg contacts the ground (pause the video if you need to). This allows that leg to do a majority of the work and allows me to change directions quickly while moving laterally.


Lateral Deceleration Shuffle (slow) Side View

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, football, lacrosse, hockey, any sport/activity that requires lateral movement or change of direction.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Lateral Deceleration

While shuffling slowly from side to side, focus on having your trailing leg (decelerating leg) make contact clearly before your leading leg. As you land on your decelerating leg, push your hips back and keep your weight in your heel. Keep your knees above your toes as you land. Your leading leg (the outside leg) should make contact with the ground as you change directions outstretched compared to your decelerating leg.

The more you use your decelerating leg to slow down and the less time your leading leg spends contacting the ground and pushing back, the quicker you will be able to change direction.

Make note of my center of gravity while my decelerating leg contacts the ground (pause the video if you need to). This allows that leg to do a majority of the work and allows me to change directions quickly while moving laterally.


Lateral Deceleration Drill: Lateral Broad Jump

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, football, lacrosse, hockey, any sport/activity that requires lateral movement or change of direction.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Lateral Deceleration

The difference with this variation is that each lateral movement is made from a complete stop, so your trailing leg is training to push off within a limited range of motion and your leading leg is training to produce the rest of the power to move your weight laterally.

Focus on having your trailing leg (decelerating leg) make contact clearly before your leading leg. As you land on your decelerating leg, push your hips back and keep your weight in your heel. Keep your knees above your toes as you land. End the landing with your weight equally distributed between legs.

Make note of my center of gravity while my decelerating leg contacts the ground (pause the video if you need to). This allows that leg to do a majority of the work and allows me to change directions quickly while moving laterally.


Lateral Deceleration Drill: Short Lateral Hop

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, football, lacrosse, hockey, any sport/activity that requires lateral movement or change of direction.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Lateral Deceleration

As you hop and turn sideways, focus on having your trailing leg (decelerating leg) make contact clearly before your leading leg. As you land on your decelerating leg, push your hips back and keep your weight in your heel. Keep your knees above your toes as you land, and end with your weight equally distributed between legs and in an athletic position.


Lateral Deceleration With Med Ball Twist

Sport Examples: tennis, basketball, hockey, football, lacrosse, any sport/activity that requires lateral movement or change of direction; especially contact sports and sports that require core strength to propel an object (tennis racquet hitting a ball, basketball player making a pass).

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body, Core

Shuffle from side to side holding a med ball in front of you. Use the med ball to rotate outwards as you change directions and add resistance to this deceleration drill along with added core stability.


Lateral Start Box Jump

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, baseball, softball, racquetball, football, lacrosse, hockey, basketball, any sport or activity that requires quick lateral change of direction.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Begin with your side facing the box. Push off your outside foot to start so as you jump towards the box, your inside leg is doing a majority of the work. Land on the box with both feet in a squat position.


Resistance Band Standing External Rotation (adducted and abducted)

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, baseball, softball, swimming, racquetball, any sport or activity that requires overhead movements of the arm which are usually centered around internal rotation of the shoulder (like throwing a ball for power or serving in tennis). These activities also benefit from optimal internal and external shoulder range of motion.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Rotator Cuff

For the adducted version, keep the elbow tucked into your ribs throughout the movement and move within your comfortable range of motion.
For the abducted version, face towards the anchor and keep your upper arm and elbow stationary as you externally rotate your forearm within your comfortable range of motion.


Resistance Band Standing Internal Rotation (adducted and abducted)

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, baseball, softball, swimming, racquetball, any sport or activity that requires overhead movements of the arm which are usually centered around internal rotation of the shoulder (like throwing a ball for power or serving in tennis). These activities also benefit from optimal internal and external shoulder range of motion.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Rotator Cuff

For the adducted version, keep the elbow tucked into your ribs throughout the movement and move within your comfortable range of motion.
For the abducted version, face away from the anchor and keep your upper arm and elbow stationary as you internally rotate your forearm (as if throwing a ball).


Resistance Band Rotator Cuff Stretch/Exercise

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, baseball, softball, swimming, racquetball, any sport or activity that requires overhead movements of the arm that can result in overuse injury or injury caused by poor shoulder stabilization. These activities also benefit from optimal internal and external shoulder range of motion.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Groups: Rotator Cuff, Deltoids

Start with a light resistance band until you feel comfortable with the stretch in your shoulder. Hold each position for at least 15 seconds. Perform the stretch AND the exercise (protraction/retraction) 5-7 days per week before and/or after you train.


Single-Leg Bound (single jump with landing)

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, basketball, track, soccer, gymnastics, football, and any sport or activity that requires balance or landing on one leg for any period of time. This is also a great exercise to use for knee/ankle injury prevention.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Balance on one leg and jump forward. When you land, push your weight back into your heel like you would during a squat. Be sure that your knee stays above your toes and your hip stays aligned with your knee.


Single-Leg Bounding (continuous)

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, basketball, track, soccer, gymnastics, football and any sport or activity that requires balance or landing on one leg for any period of time. This is also a great exercise to use for knee/ankle injury prevention.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Balance on one leg and jump forward continuously. When you land, be sure that your knee stays above your toes and your hip stays aligned with your knee.


Single-Leg Box Jump

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, hockey, lacrosse, baseball, softball, racquetball, any sport/activity that requires explosive lower body movements such as jumping or cutting on one or both legs.

Difficulty: Advanced

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Start balanced on one leg facing a box. Bend down and push your hips back and explode up onto the box. Land on the same leg you jumped off of, again with your hips pushed back and your weight in your heel, knee above the toes.


Single-Leg Vertical Jump

Sport Examples: volleyball, tennis, basketball, track, soccer, gymnastics, football, and any sport or activity that requires balance or landing on one leg for any period of time.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Jump straight up on one leg and land in a balanced position, then work to be able to do it repeatedly. As you land, push your weight back into your heel so you feel the landing in your glutes, not just your quads. When watching from the front, notice how the knee stays above the toes and doesn’t track medially or laterally, and the hip doesn’t pop out to the side.


Split Step With Diagonal Single-Leg Landing

Sport Examples: tennis, basketball, soccer, football, hockey, and any sport or activity that requires cutting diagonally or landing on one leg.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Take one or two steps forward and land with feet outside shoulder width before you push off diagonally to one side, landing on one leg and balanced with your hips pushed back and knee above the toe.