Keeping your body in the game.

Most of these should be performed as needed – if you never have any shoulder issues or participate in any activities that use the shoulder repeatedly (tennis, racquetball, pickle ball, swimming, softball, volleyball, resistance training, etc.), you wouldn’t need to spend time 4-5 days per week performing the shoulder exercises/stretches that are demonstrated.

On the other hand, knowing how to squat correctly or land after jumping can benefit anyone. If you participate in activities that require any amount of agility, change of direction, or bending of the legs that may require balance, the lower body balance, stability, and deceleration drills may be for you.


Ankle Stability: Bosu Land and Balance

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, lacrosse, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires quick change of direction or landing from a jump.

Difficulty: Intermediate to Advanced

Muscle Group: Ankle/Legs

*Only attempt this variation once you’re able to balance on one foot in the center of the Bosu ball.

Stand next to a Bosu Ball and balance on one foot. Push your hips back and jump onto the center of the Bosu ball, keeping your weight in your glutes and your knee above or behind your toe. Balance for a couple seconds, and hop off.


Ankle Stability: Single Leg Bosu Balance

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, lacrosse, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires quick change of direction or landing from a jump.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Ankle/Lower Leg

Simply stand in the center of a Bosu ball one foot at a time, allowing your lower-leg musculature and balance to adjust to keep you upright. If one leg is too difficult, start by standing on both feet.


Broad Jump Landing Mechanics: Forward to Forward

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires landing or slowing down from a jump or run.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Power and Deceleration

Start by dropping down into a squat. Leap forward instantly using your arms as well as your legs. As you land, push your hips back so your glutes and hamstrings do a majority of the work and your quads aren’t able to over-power them. Don’t allow your knees to track in front of, in the middle of, or to the outside of your toes upon landing.


Broad Jump Landing Mechanics: Forward to Sideways

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires landing or slowing down from a jump or run.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Power and Deceleration

Start by dropping down into a squat and leap forward. As you’re in the air, turn your body 90 degrees and land moving laterally.

The key here is to use the trailing leg to decelerate your body first, while finishing the landing with your weight equally distributed between legs. As you land, push your weight back into your heels so your glutes are doing a majority of the work. Don’t allow your knees to track over your toes.


Broad Jump Landing Mechanics: Sideways to Forward

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires landing or slowing down from a jump or run.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body Power and Deceleration

Start by dropping down into a squat. Leap laterally, initiating the movement with your trailing leg and getting a majority of the power from your leading leg. As you’re in the air, turn your body 90 degrees and land facing the direction you’re moving.

The key here is to use the trailing leg to accelerate your body first, and the leading leg to produce a majority of the power to propel your body while finishing the landing with your weight equally distributed between legs. As you land, push your weight back into your heels so your glutes are doing a majority of the work. Don’t allow your knees to track over your toes or cave inwards or outwards.


Foam Rolling (basic)

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Everything!

Sit on the floor with your lower legs resting on the roller. Lift your body off the ground and slowly roll back and forth while turning from side to side for 30-60 seconds per muscle area. If you roll over a tight spot or a knot in the muscle, rest your weight on it for a few seconds, and then continue rolling. Continue rolling each muscle group that you’re physically able to roll on.

Foam rolling can improve flexibility, increase blood flow to tissue, break up knots and scar tissue, and help prevent overuse injuries such as IT band syndrome and shin splints. Repeat daily, before and/or after exercise.


Forward Deceleration (slow mo)

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, lacrosse, baseball, softball, tennis, football, any sport/activity that requires slowing down from a run.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Deceleration when running straight forward should be kept low with your weight in your heels and knees above your ankles/toes.

Start by running 60% speed for 10 yards and try to stop within 3 steps. Work up to 100% speed for 10 yards and stop within 3 steps.


Kettlebell Circumduction Rotator Cuff Stretch/Exercise

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Rotator Cuff/Shoulder

Use this rotator cuff stretch/exercise to increase the flexibility, strength and range of motion of the shoulder.


Lacrosse Ball Forearm Smash

Sport Examples: Any racquet sport (tennis, badminton, racquetball) baseball, golf, wrestling.

Muscle Group: Forearm

Grab a lacrosse ball (or tennis ball if you prefer something lighter) and stand next to a wall. As you pin the ball between the wall and your forearm, roll it around and dig into the (almost always) tight and neglected muscles.

As you can see me flex and extend my wrist, do so while sitting on a particularly tight area and try not to wince too much.

*Brought to you by the teachings of Kelly Starrett*


Lacrosse Ball Trapezius Smash

Sport Examples: Anything and everything that creates tension in the upper back and between the shoulder blades.

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Trapezius

Grab a lacrosse ball (or tennis ball if you prefer something lighter) and stand next to a wall. As you pin the ball between the wall and your upper traps, roll it around and dig into your knots and tight areas.

Let the ball move down between the shoulder blades as you hug your shoulders – allowing your shoulder blades to pull apart and reveal more tender areas that are hard to reach.

You can also apply more pressure by using the same technique while laying on the ground on top of the ball.

*Brought to you by the teachings of Kelly Starrett*


Resistance Band Rotator Cuff Stretch/Exercise

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Groups: Rotator cuff, Deltoids

Start with a light resistance band until you feel comfortable with the stretch in your shoulder. Hold each position for at least 15 seconds. Perform the stretch AND the exercise (protraction/retraction) 5-7 days per week before and/or after you train.


Resistance Band Standing External Rotation (adducted and abducted)

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Rotator Cuff

For the adducted version, keep the elbow tucked into your ribs throughout the movement and move within your comfortable range of motion.
For the abducted version, face towards the anchor and keep your upper arm and elbow stationary as you externally rotate your forearm within your comfortable range of motion.


Resistance Band Standing Internal Rotation (adducted and abducted)

Difficulty: Beginner

Muscle Group: Rotator Cuff

For the adducted version, keep the elbow tucked into your ribs throughout the movement and move within your comfortable range of motion.
For the abducted version, face away from the anchor and keep your upper arm and elbow stationary as you internally rotate your forearm (as if throwing a ball).


Single Leg Bound (single jump with landing)

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires quick deceleration or landing on one leg.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Balance on one leg and jump forward. When you land, push your weight back into your heel like you would during a squat. Be sure that your knee stays above your toes and your hip stays aligned with your knee.


Single Leg Vertical Jump

Sport Examples: soccer, basketball, tennis, volleyball, football, any sport/activity that requires quick deceleration or landing on one leg.

Difficulty: Intermediate

Muscle Group: Lower Body

Jump straight up on one leg and land in a balanced position, then work to be able to do it repeatedly. As you land, push your weight back into your heel so you feel the landing in your glutes, not just your quads. When watching from the front, notice how the knee stays above the toes and doesn’t track medially or laterally, and the hip doesn’t pop out to the side.